cropping multiple images

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This topic contains 12 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  THX1138 13 years, 10 months ago.

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  • #38373

    THX1138
    Participant

    i’m going to be using an olmpus digital camera for filming, so images will be squared. but i want widescreen for some movies.

    what software will take a selected amount of photots, and crop them as the user specifies? i want to be able to crop hundreds of images exactly the same and at the same time. i know photoshop will do this, but can the gimp? are there any other programs that will do this?

    #38379

    fll-freak
    Participant

    Are you good at programing and have access to MSVC? If so, you can use the
    CxImage free graphics library to write your own. That is what I am doing to
    make my zoom and pan clips from static pictures. The library and sample app
    are a great starting point for some very complex image processing.

    #38380

    Lieberman Bros.
    Participant

    IMO, whats the point of cropping for widescreen? The whole perpose of having widescreen is to have more to look at. If your just cropping, then it defeats the purpose, in a sense that instead of getting more your getting rid of more.

    But if you still want to do this, then try videomach. It’s free btw.

    #38400

    The Janitor
    Participant

    “Lieberman Bros.” wrote: IMO, whats the point of cropping for widescreen? The whole perpose of having widescreen is to have more to look at. If your just cropping, then it defeats the purpose, in a sense that instead of getting more your getting rid of more.

    The reason some of us crop our movies to widescreen is to give them a more cinematic look. To me, widescreen=film and fullscreen=television. Even though it’s not “true” widescreen, it is enough to fool most anyone.

    And yes, THX, Videomach should do exactly what you are asking.

    #38510

    THX1138
    Participant

    i use videomach, i thought i saw an option for that. ill have to look a third time.

    i want to crop because since im using a digital camera and not a webcam, i get too much of a scene, like bacground stuff i dont want included, when im doing a close-up on a minifig, i cant get that close, so i stay a distnace back, and just blow up the image, and crop the crap i dont want. i figured since im going to be cropping anyways, why not do some widescreen?

    for my first films, im not doing windescreen. im going to use widescreen for my more serious films to give it a more cinematic look.

    “The reason some of us crop our movies to widescreen is to give them a more cinematic look. To me, widescreen=film and fullscreen=television. Even though it’s not “true” widescreen, it is enough to fool most anyone. ” EXACTLY! (sorry, i dont konw how to quote people well yet)

    #38515

    Dan
    Participant

    the widescreen looks good as long as when you film you plan on it and use it well.

    it does look bad when its done as an after thought.

    #40381

    technicpuppy
    Participant

    Virtualdub will do this. Add any filter (i.e. resize without changing the parameters). Once the filter is added, the “cropping” button will be activated in the add filter dialog.

    Additionally, you can also use the resize filter to fill areas of the screen so that it goes back to a PAL or NTSC height and width. I’ve found that neither Xdiv nor Divx will compress loops which do not measure to those standards.

    BTW, you will two steps to crop (1) and fill (2). And, BTW 2, the program will apply cropping to either a video loop or to a sequence of static images.

    Virtualdub is a free and open source great digital video processor.

    virtualdub.org

    #40382

    hali
    Participant

    Videomach is great for this. It will even crop your images and make them into a video at the same time (well, okay, not AT the same time, but close enough).

    “Lieberman Bros.” wrote: IMO, whats the point of cropping for widescreen? The whole perpose of having widescreen is to have more to look at. If your just cropping, then it defeats the purpose, in a sense that instead of getting more your getting rid of more.

    But if you still want to do this, then try videomach. It’s free btw.

    Lieberman… where do I start…

    Widescreen ISN’T about having ‘more to look at’. Widescreen (in all of its ratios and varieties) is about presenting visual information in a different way.

    Some people argue (and I tend to agree with this) that a ‘wider’ screen is more like the way we humans perceive reality. That is, with our eyes side by side, we have a much wider field of view then we have high.

    (Try it. Hold both of your hands directly in front of and just touching your nose. Lift one straight up and the other straight down, while keeping both eyes looking straight ahead. Stop moving your hands when you can only just see them in your peripheral vision. Now look up and down and note how far apart they are.

    Now repeat. But this time move your left hand as far left and right hand as far right. Most people are able to stretch their arms almost to full width and just see both hands, while still looking straight ahead.

    Now even if you factor in eyeball and head movement, the fact of the matter is that your field of view is much wider than it is high.

    Note: IMAX takes advantage of this in different way by trying to account for eyeball and head movement. Let’s not go there…)

    OKAY, so I’ve demonstrated that widescreen (may) more accurately represent human vision, does that mean cropping a film makes it look better?

    Of course not! If you film in a full screen aspect and then crop it you are going to lose elements you intended to capture. BUT if you film in fullscreen, with widescreen in mind, then cropping afterwards gives you even more power during editing, as you can choose (from your constructed widescreen shot) just what ‘framing’ and ‘construction’ looks best for what you are trying to achieve.

    This is not at all uncommon in the ‘real world’ of film making. One of the best examples of this I have seen is in the special features on the “Se7en” DVD. It shows post production where a shot is being realigned to get Brad Pitt’s head in just the right position in order to convey the right feeling. It demonstrates that the cinematographer’s footage is not necessarily what becomes the final footage (ie, not all of what is shot in a frame is used), and that the director and other people manipulate the footage for effect.

    I guess I’m saying don’t rule out widescreen. Think about (and look at) what is being done visually, and what YOU want to do, and then go from there.

    Hali

    #40434

    THX1138
    Participant

    im doing rogue squadron in widescreen because of the style: it’s the typical movie format. but thn again, i might do full-screen, just because it’s really a 5-part series of films, each one around 15-20 minutes.

    #40440

    Stefan
    Participant

    You completely missed the point, didn’t you? It’s something you plan in advance, not something you decide afterwards. For each shot you carefully position camera, actors and props so that a widescreen version will show the important details.

    Stefan.

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