Aspect Ratio for Film

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  High Tower 10 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #229248

    High Tower
    Participant

    I was wondering what aspect ratio film shoots at. I was thinking that it was 16:9, but we were doing stuff with Negotiations, and we made a picture that was 1600 pixels by 900 pixels, and it didn’t look as wide as films that are truely widescreen.

    Also, the new 16:9 TVs, it appears to be the same dimensions as our picture, but when you watch a widescreen movie, you still see a tad bit of black on the top and bottom.

    So, my question is, what is the standard aspect ratio for film? 16:9 is the thing that I’ve always heard, but it doesn’t seem wide enough. Help would be appreciated.

    Thanks,

    -ht

    #229256

    Watson
    Participant

    There isn’t a standard. There are several popular formats, but, in the end, it comes down to personal preference and style. 16:9 is widely used in tv, since that is the aspect ratio of HDTVs, but it is not as popular in film (at least, not from what I’ve seen). Movies generally use wider aspect ratios.

    #229257

    dvondrake
    Participant

    I beleive you’re thinking of anamorphic. 🙂

    #229284

    Cometgreen
    Participant

    The Brickfilms Encyclopedia is there for a reason.

    Cometgreen

    #229306

    Ninian
    Participant

    That’s a nice link Dvondrake, I should use Wikepedia more often. I only ever use it for college work.

    #229308

    An Old Ore
    Participant

    Actually, anamorphic is a way to put more information into the same area, sort of. If you take a regular camera and put an anamorphic lens on it, what you will see when you play it back is that the image looks like it was ‘squished’ from the sides.

    That’s what the lens does. The second stage is needed, where the standard image is streched out so that it looks widescreen. I’ve used anamorphic lenses and although they make for good footage, they are a pain to focus with. They’re also not very good for fast tracking shots.

    If you want widescreen, the better (read: more expensive) option is to get a widescreen lens. And I’m pretty sure they don’t make any for consumer-level cameras.

    As to the question asked, most cinemas use either 1.85:1 or the more popular 2.35:1 ratios. Personally, I don’t like the 2.35:1 DVD’s because even on widescreen tv’s you get half the screen as flat black. It’s great for cinema (where they have a 40 foot screen) but not for tv.

    If you’re making a brickfilm, I’d stick with standard 4:3 (most webcams) or at the most go for 16:9 (either by cropping larger images or with a DV camera). If you’re making a live-action project, I’d say go with the default for the camera that your using. Some have a wide-screen mode, but it really depends on what you are doing.

    There’s a really good explanation of aspect ratios here.

    #229324

    Ninian
    Participant

    Nice post An Old Ore, I agree with you about the 2.35:1 ratio for DVD’s.

    #229631

    Matthew Buick
    Participant

    I want to do my Brickfilms in 2:35:1. 🙂

    #229679

    High Tower
    Participant

    Thanks for the answers guys. I really appreciate it.

    Oh, and CG, thank you for pointing me to the Encyclopedia, but that has nothing in there to answer my questions. It’s mainly about 16:9, and, I read it already. 🙂

    Thanks,

    -ht

    #229681

    Kyle
    Participant

    I still hate the idea of anamorphic on a DV cam because even with an anamorphic lens the camera will compress the video to DV in a 4:3 format. Either way you technically loose resolution but o well. Cropping to 4:3 with brickfilming is obviously the way to go.

    -Kyle

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