Intel CS330

This topic contains 7 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by Profile photo of infurno infurno 8 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #268272
    Profile photo of housestudios
    housestudios
    Participant

    Is the Intel CS330 worth getting as a brickfilming camera?

    #268275
    Profile photo of BertL
    BertL
    Participant

    It would certainly appear so. I believe Blunty has a webcam like that.

    And oh yeah, you can check yourself whether a camera is good or not.

    “Short guide to buying good webcams I” wrote: There are three major and equally important factors when looking at whether or not a webcam is a good choice.
    The first factor is does the webcam have manual focus? When filming, you want your images to be sharp, and not all blurry. Most webcams that have manual focus will have this stated in the specifications. Generally, when there’s nothing mentioned about manual focus, the webcam either has fixed focus (you can not change the focus at all), or auto focus (the camera automatically changes the focus, something which you cannot control).
    The second factor is what is the maximum resolution of the webcam? The higher the maximum resolution, the more crisp your images will look when (for example) you watch your film at fullscreen. Usually this is in the specifications too. IMPORTANT: when looking at the maximum resolution check whether it is software enhanced or not. Software enhanced (or sometimes called interpolated means that the highest resolution is made by software who takes a ‘normal’ resolution (let’s say 640×480) image and calculates the colors that should be in every pixel in the high-resolution (1280×960, for example).
    The third factor is can you put the settings on ‘manual’? With any camera, you’d want total control over the settings. The three things you need control over are exposure, shutter speed and white balance. They determine how bright, and how ‘yellowish’ your picture is. If these three are on auto, you will get a very flickery film.

    #268292
    Profile photo of chosen1
    chosen1
    Participant

    I use the CS430, which is it’s direct cousin, and yeah it is great.

    #268412
    Profile photo of Blunty
    Blunty
    Participant

    I’ve been making all my brickfilms with it since my fourth movie. yes it’s great – good luck finding it though, it’s old, and has been discontinued for some time. It was EOL when I brought it over 5 years ago.

    #268443
    Profile photo of chosen1
    chosen1
    Participant

    If you are looking for one Look on eBay, last time I checked it usually has one or two….And yeah, it still does.

    #268446
    Profile photo of Aled Owen
    Aled Owen
    Participant

    It’s good like the QC4000, there’s a Camera Stand for it too (I think!). So it seems a very worthy camera and I therefore recommend it.

    -Aled

    #268489
    Profile photo of chosen1
    chosen1
    Participant

    All you need to do for that cam is get one of these:

    Put the base on the camera and then tape it down to the Lego. Voila.

    #268496
    Profile photo of infurno
    infurno
    Participant

    “BertL” wrote:
    [quote="Short guide to buying good webcams I"]There are three major and equally important factors when looking at whether or not a webcam is a good choice.
    The first factor is does the webcam have manual focus? When filming, you want your images to be sharp, and not all blurry. Most webcams that have manual focus will have this stated in the specifications. Generally, when there’s nothing mentioned about manual focus, the webcam either has fixed focus (you can not change the focus at all), or auto focus (the camera automatically changes the focus, something which you cannot control).
    The second factor is what is the maximum resolution of the webcam? The higher the maximum resolution, the more crisp your images will look when (for example) you watch your film at fullscreen. Usually this is in the specifications too. IMPORTANT: when looking at the maximum resolution check whether it is software enhanced or not. Software enhanced (or sometimes called interpolated means that the highest resolution is made by software who takes a ‘normal’ resolution (let’s say 640×480) image and calculates the colors that should be in every pixel in the high-resolution (1280×960, for example).
    The third factor is can you put the settings on ‘manual’? With any camera, you’d want total control over the settings. The three things you need control over are exposure, shutter speed and white balance. They determine how bright, and how ‘yellowish’ your picture is. If these three are on auto, you will get a very flickery film.

    [/quote]

    You should post that in the encyclopedia, so you won’t have to paste it all over again.

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