Storyboarding

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This topic contains 17 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by Profile photo of PE-porukka PE-porukka 9 years, 10 months ago.

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  • #141374
    Profile photo of The Duke
    The Duke
    Participant

    Hey guys,

    I was just wondering if any of you storyboard. I’ve read that it’s always good to, but I tried it for the first time today, and thanks to my awesome drawing skills, it came out looking like a five-year-old drew it. I’m really bad at drawing, so I just couldn’t get any of the angles the way I was visuallizing in my head. So it’s not really working out very well for me. So I guess my question is, do you all storyboard, and if so, do you find it helpful?

    #141400
    Profile photo of Blunty
    Blunty
    Participant

    I’ve never storyboarded any of my 30 something brickfilms. Storyboards are used in “real” movies because you have a huge team to comminucate the film, it’s look and it’s cinematography to, and storyboards are the best way to communicate such visual ideas to other people in said team.
    As a one man team, as most of us here are, drawing out storyboards have always seemed completely redundant to me, and infact a waste of time I could spend elsewhere on the film. It’s not that I don’t knwo how, or don’t have the artistic skills, I spent many years producing comics so i could it I chose to… but I don’t need to.
    I Write the script, quite often I have a picture in my head about how I’d like certain shots to look, or how I’d like it to “feel”, and I figure out how to do it… the rest of the shots I “find” while setting up the shot.

    #141425
    Profile photo of Cometgreen
    Cometgreen
    Participant

    “Blunty” wrote: As a one man team, as most of us here are, drawing out storyboards have always seemed completely redundant to me

    Exactly. There’s no real reason to storyboard for most of us, imo, unless you have a good idea for a shot but are afraid you might forget it. I’ve tried storyboarding before and it’s helped me think of a few cool things to include in my shot, but I can’t even begin to reproduce perspective and scale on a piece of paper, so what I draw and what the set and camera show me tend to make the storyboards useless.

    Cometgreen

    #141479
    Profile photo of Nosniborus
    Nosniborus
    Participant

    Well . . .
    I agree about the one-man-team not needing a storyboard to understand how a shot will look, and I also agree that some of the best shots are thought of while you’re setting up, but if you’re doing complex/dramatic lighting, elaborate sets, and very planned special effects, storyboards can be essential, just so you can nail down which walls will be removable, and where a certain light needs to be “built in” to a certain area.
    This is less true when you’re building sets out of Lego, but I can imagine things get a lot more complex when you’re building the sets out of anything less flexible, like cardboard, and especially wood.

    -Nos

    #141515
    Profile photo of Rolz
    Rolz
    Participant

    Hmmm… I could actually try storyboarding once, seeing as most of my films seem very rushed and thrown-together. I don’t even write scripts. I was always afraid of doing something like those, since I just want to sit down and animate the things I have in mind. Perhaps, if I’d try it, I would end up with a waste of time, as I can keep everything in my head (shots, characters, even all the lines), and I can easily change anything, without having to rewrite the script and spend even more time.

    A big memory always helps. :)

    #141517
    Profile photo of Bonzai
    Bonzai
    Participant

    You know what, even though my drawing is crappy, I still use storyboards to lay out ideas for stuff. Just as long as I can see all of my ideas on paper, I can generally lay out my scenes better.

    #141599
    Profile photo of RHE
    RHE
    Participant

    I tried using a storyboard for one of my films but on the spot of filming I decided to make changes so it was kindof pointless.

    #141621
    Profile photo of Stefan
    Stefan
    Participant

    I find that storyboard-drawing forces you to think about the visuals of the movie. Usually I have one or two neat ideas, but there are quite a few shots in between to connect those ideas. Also, I’m a bad script writer – for Daedalus and Icarus I had just written the narrator track, and it has proven quite bad: I didn’t have nearly enough narrator bits to keep everything together.

    For Great Inventors 2 the storyboard *was* my script. Things that really impress me are people who can do visual gags. This doesn’t happen too often in a brickfilm. I’m too tired to think up examples, apart from the “assistance” bit in Wallace and Gromit. There’s no way you think of that when you’re writing down words – or at least, my brain doesn’t work like that.

    Stefan.

    #141718
    Profile photo of The Duke
    The Duke
    Participant

    Well, it looks like there are some good points on both sides, but I think that I am going to go ahead and storyboard for my current movie, which I would consider sort of an epic, not that it will be real epic film, but for me and my limited experience, it will be. I really don’t want it to look just “thrown together” as has been said. I guess it couldn’t hurt. Thanks guys, for all the advice. Thanks to you, Z for all the examples and stuff. You were very encouraging!

    #141721
    Profile photo of Cometgreen
    Cometgreen
    Participant

    I really don’t want it to look just “thrown together” as has been said.

    A storyboard is not the only way to prevent that, but whatever.

    It’s your time. Spend it how you wish.

    Cometgreen

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