Voice Over Recording in Stop Motion Tips

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This topic has 2 voices, contains 8 replies, and was last updated by Avatar of Morten Morten 125 days ago.

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February 17, 2014 at 5:02 pm #440074
Avatar of Anna C.
Anna C.

How do I sound to stop motion ? – Audio – What to do!
Tips when using a microphone.

A good voiceover recording doesn’t require expensive equipment or a well designed recording studio, nor does it require a tremendous amount of experience or “know how” to achieve a good result. A little common sense and effort, and a critical ear can work wonders. It is worth noting however that not all stop motion software is designed to allow you add sound easily. So be careful in selecting your software.

Use a good quality microphone when recording your voice. Ensure that you test levels a few times by recording a test dialogue. Don’t place the microphone too close to your mouth in order to avoid sound distortion in the recording. Explosions of air bursting from the mouth, the lips and tongue can sound wet, and “sss” sounds can overwhelm a recording.

The other thing to watch out for is “Reflections”. If you are speaking in to your microphone while close to a hard surface such as a wall you will get reflected sound from that surface. These reflections degrade the sound quality. To avoid this try using a few cushions or carpet as a surface that you are facing. This will reduce reflections and improve sound quality.

Tips for using a headset to record your voice overs.

Again a reasonably good quality recording for your stop motion animation voice over can be achieved with a headset as long as the quality of the headset is good. Using a cheap (tacky) headset will almost certainly result in a thin crackly voice over recording. So if you have a good headset then follow all the rules mentioned in the tips for using a microphone mentioned above and you will get good results with a bit of trial an error.

credits:http://www.stopmotioncentral.com/Audio1.html

February 19, 2014 at 4:08 pm #440092
Avatar of Anna C.
Anna C.

Can anyone add a few tips of their own? :-)

March 13, 2014 at 4:39 pm #440265
Avatar of Morten
Morten

Got some old nylon panteyhoes/stockings? Then you have a pop filyer for your mic! If you ever seen a studio where they have this grey/black round thing atatched the mic? Thats the pop filter.
A pop filter is a thin fabric between yur mouth and the mic that is supressing those hard P,T,S sounds.
You can strech and tape/glue the nylon stocking to a clothshanger or a sircle made from metal wire, or what not else. The room for improvisation is there.
(For more info, and a DIY guide http://youtu.be/NLavNbfH7j0 )

Also, to counter room resonance, Hang up blankets around the recording area. Blankets dont reflect sound(as much as walls do). If you have a non headset mic you can easily convert a cardboard box, by putting foam or other soft stuff on the inside, To become a audio shield. The mic onside is shielded from all ways but the one you/or your voice actor is talking into! Golly!

March 14, 2014 at 1:49 pm #440267
Avatar of Anna C.
Anna C.

Thanks Morten! What’s P.T.S.?

March 15, 2014 at 12:47 pm #440273
Avatar of Morten
Morten

No, not PTS. The sounds you make when saying “p”, “t” and “s” are often hard sounds in a recording. The pop filter softens the sound, or so I believe. (also it’s good for stoping saliva/spit from ruining your mic.)

March 18, 2014 at 2:05 pm #440293
Avatar of Anna C.
Anna C.

Oh, I see. Thanks!

March 29, 2014 at 4:38 pm #440431
Avatar of Morten
Morten

Some notes on Voice acting. Make some notes on how you made the voice. Example from Hobbit Quest I
Gandalf- “duckface” while talking in Gandalf manner.
Uruk hai Waitress – Raspy/Growly at the deep throat and a bit deeper voice. ( I also use this raspy sound in the back of the throat to imulate dingerydoo, but it hurts the voice at longer intervals!)

Practice Do a recording while you practice the line in varios ways, then listen to it.
Do manny recordings and pick the best lines from the bunch.
If you do a continous recording but dont have a clapper, Snap your fingers or clap you hands everytime you star a new line. This makes it easy to see where you need to cut when in edit.
If doing a voiceover on film, Have the film on another screen that the computer/device you are recording with. Like a Tablet or smart phone. Then you dont have to fiddle with the computer to reset the movie if doing manny recordings in a run.

April 23, 2014 at 4:48 am #440599
Avatar of Anna C.
Anna C.

Cool! I never knew there are actually clappers to help you separate the lines.

I need to play more with my voice and record it as it seems that no matter what I do, it still sounds the same :D

Thanks for the tips!

April 28, 2014 at 6:18 am #440644
Avatar of Morten
Morten

When trying to find a voice for the caracter. Keep in mind the caracters emotion, and nature. Unless its a funny gag, the happy baker should not sound like a hungover batman.

Make notes, so that you can find the voice again. I said it before.

To exersise, i sugest trying to talk like celeberties and folks around you. Most people can do arnold swartseneger to some degree, but how about christofer walken? Jim carry? Wreslers are fun too bwcause they are so eksaggerated. Notice how they us their words to exspress. Take notes. :-)

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