What you think makes a good brickfilm

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This topic contains 80 replies, has 48 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of BrixForce BrixForce 2 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #395526
    Profile photo of Eclipse Productions
    Eclipse Productions
    Participant

    This should be a topic that saves newbies from wasting time on tests, when they could make good films by reading this thread. Just post what you think makes a good brickfilm. Cover random detailed subjects, like, set design, lighting, animation, etc. I’ll post an example next.
    ______________________________________________________
    Subject: Lego “in-door” model design (furniture)
    When designing furniture, it can be good to look at real furniture from around the house. For example, a couch. Make it a little interesting. Instead of boring traditional bricks, use curved bricks and other less-common bricks. But don’t make it too complex. The area minifigs will sit on will be flat, of course, but the arm rests and backrests can be curved. Just make what you think looks best.
    ______________________________________________________
    This is sort-of like a miniature wiki. But you don’t need to make a new account for it, and you can easily comment and ask questions. And anyway, some of these “tips” (or whatever you want to call it) would make a short and bad wiki article.
    So, let me know what you think of this thread, and post “tips”!
    P.S. The subject part of tips should be in large size like the one above.
    size:

    [size=18]Subject: [/size]
    #395527
    Profile photo of MysteryCo.
    MysteryCo.
    Participant

    When I make furniture for my videos I make it look interesting but not like just one color but I add alot of details.

    #395558
    Profile photo of LEGOStudios
    LEGOStudios
    Participant

    Well a good story.Film is all about telling a story.I was going to say realistic but um legos aren’t real are they?Random things aren’t always good.It’s good to know why where and when something happens.That’s why some films list titles “New York 11:15AM 1999.And show opening scenes in front of a building or wherever the audience
    wants to know.If every movie just had random things I’d go crazy WHAT????Now you don’t have to have the greatest story in the world but have something thats not just some person who got loose with a camera.Random things are more like tests to me.

    #395562
    Profile photo of Hazzat
    Hazzat
    Participant

    Topic: Interior design

    Look at a room in your house. Any room (except the attic). Look at the wall. And what’s at the bottom? A skirting. A long wooden panel painted a colour that is similar to the walk itself. Try and include these in your sets. Just a row of bricks that are a different colour at the bottom of the wall. Go watch a film by a good brickfilmer and check for the skirting.

    P.S. I’ll sticky this when I find out how.

    #395566
    Profile photo of Leonardo812
    Leonardo812
    Participant

    “Hazzat” wrote:

    P.S. I’ll sticky this when I find out how.

    No need. I did it for you.

    -Leonardo

    #395580
    Profile photo of Nosniborus
    Nosniborus
    Participant

    Topic: STORY

    Brickfilming takes a lot of work. there are only a few “great” brickfilmers because of this — not everyone has the patience and willpower to actually finish something they started. If you plan to exert this much effort in making a project, I HIGHLY recommend that you write a strong, concise script before you begin, and / or (especially if there is limited dialog and lots of action) storyboard your entire film. If you can accomplish this pre-production work, your final project will look downright professional. It will also help keep you motivated, because you’ll know at every point in production how far along you really are.

    -Nos

    p.s. This was originally part of a PM I sent to T.G-Tom

    #395586
    Profile photo of Leonardo812
    Leonardo812
    Participant

    “Nosniborus” wrote: If you plan to exert this much effort in making a project, I HIGHLY recommend that you write a strong, concise script before you begin, and / or (especially if there is limited dialog and lots of action) storyboard your entire film. If you can accomplish this pre-production work, your final project will look downright professional. It will also help keep you motivated, because you’ll know at every point in production how far along you really are.

    That is definitely solid advice. Also, pick a story/plot/setting that you really love. Something that you lie in bed at night and think, “Man! This film is going to be incredible!” You need something like that to keep yourself interested in the film for the amount of time that it’s going to take to produce.

    I’m working on a film right now that’s like that. I look over the footage I’ve shot and it just makes me want to finish the film as soon as possible to see how it will turn out.

    -Leonardo

    #395595
    Profile photo of Eclipse Productions
    Eclipse Productions
    Participant

    “Leonardo812″ wrote: [quote="Hazzat"]

    P.S. I’ll sticky this when I find out how.

    No need. I did it for you.

    -Leonardo[/quote]
    Wow. I made a sticky-worthy topic!

    #395596
    Profile photo of Littlebrick
    Littlebrick
    Participant

    All you need is Phil. Dr. Phil.

    #396190
    Profile photo of Rodney102
    Rodney102
    Participant

    What impresses everyone about Brickfilms is the fact that it’s LEGO people moving about, as opposed to usual film making methods such as live action or CGI animation. One thing I hate in movies is over-use of CGI. If there’s a big explosion, it’s more exciting to know that the explosion was actaully created, and wasn’t done on a computer. Where you can, you should do that with animations. I’m not suggesting that you create explosions and risk having your plastic models melt into nothing but a sludge, obviously that’s something you would have to use computers for, but the less CGI the better in my opinion.

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